The quantity of a unit is defined by the product of the volume and density of a substance.

It just means that the weight of the product is equal to the weight of the input material.

For example, if we want to crush 200 grams of sugar, we would need to put 200 grams of sugar into a container. The volume of the sugar in the container is equal to the volume of the sugar. The density of the sugar is equal to the weight of the sugar. The result of the crushing process is a 200 gram quantity of sugar with a density of 1.

It might sound like a silly example, but the quantity of sugar that makes a product is not always equal to the sugar in the same product. Let’s say we want to crush 100 grams of flour. The volume of the flour in the container is the same as the volume of the flour so the weight of the flour is also equal to the weight of the flour.

The same goes for the volume of the sugar. The volume of the sugar in the container is 100 gram so it’s also the same as the volume of the sugar.

But the quantity of sugar in a product is not the same as the quantity that the sugar in the sugar product is. So if we crush 100 grams of flour, and we want to crush 50 grams of sugar, we will have a 50 gram sugar product, but there will be no 25 gram sugar product because there is no 25 gram sugar in the sugar product.

In this case, we can use the same logic that we used to figure out the volume of the sugar in the original batch of sugar.

If the quantity of output for each stage of a process is the same, then the quantity of a product produced, with inputs, is the sum of the quantities of each input. In this case, the quantity of output is the same for each input, so the quantity of the output is the sum of the quantities of each input.

Because the quantity produced in each stage of the process is equal, the quantity of a product produced is the sum of the quantities of each input. So the quantity of the output is the sum of the quantities of each input, which is the same as the quantity of the input.

We can think of this as the amount of “deadweight” or “dead weight” being moved from each input to the output. The “deadweight” refers to the amount of work that is being done by one input on the next. For example, the input “I make a video” is the same work as the input “I take a picture”, as we can see in the graph.